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ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating

About:

The ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating (formerly the ISU Champions Series) is a series of international invitational competitions organized by the International Skating Union. Elite figure skaters compete in the disciplines of ladies’ singles, men’s singles, pair skating, and ice dancing. The junior-level equivalent is the ISU Junior Grand Prix.

Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final

Results:

Name Results Date Location Nation
ISU Grand Prix Final 2020/21 2020 Dec 10 – Dec 13, 2020 Beijing
ISU Grand Prix Final 2019/20 2019 Dec 5 – Dec 8, 2019 Torino
ISU Grand Prix Final 2018/19 2018 Dec 6 – Dec 9, 2018 Vancouver, BC
ISU Grand Prix Final 2017/18 2017 Dec 7 – Dec 10, 2017 Nagoya
ISU Grand Prix Final 2016/17 2016 Dec 8 – Dec 11, 2016 Marseille
ISU Grand Prix Final 2015/16 2015 Dec 10 – Dec 13, 2015 Barcelona
ISU Grand Prix Final 2014/15 2014 Dec 11 – Dec 14, 2014 Barcelona

Background:

The Grand Prix of Figure Skating Final is an international, senior-level figure skating competition. It is the culmination of the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating series. Skaters compete in men’s singles, ladies’ singles, pair skating, and ice dancing. The competition was originally called the Champions Series Final and was known that way until 1998. Its name is often shortened to Grand Prix Final and abbreviated as GPF. The Grand Prix Final is the culminating event of the ISU Grand Prix of Figure Skating series, which consists of the Skate America, Skate Canada International, Trophée Eric Bompard, Cup of China, Cup of Russia, and NHK Trophy competitions. Skaters earn points according to placement on the Grand Prix series. The top six skaters or teams from each discipline compete in the Final. The rules for the final have varied from year to year. In recent years, the skaters perform the short program (original dance for ice dancers) in reverse order of their rankings, so the top scorer in the Grand Prix series skates last. The skating order for the long program (free dance for ice dancers) is the reverse order of their placement in the short program or original dance, unlike other competitions where start orders are determined by a random draw.